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Antique Pair of Sketches by Thomas Barker of Bath 18th Century

Antique Pair of Sketches by Thomas Barker of Bath 18th Century
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  • Antique Pair of Sketches by Thomas Barker of Bath 18th Century
  • Antique Pair of Sketches by Thomas Barker of Bath 18th Century
  • Antique Pair of Sketches by Thomas Barker of Bath 18th Century
  • Antique Pair of Sketches by Thomas Barker of Bath 18th Century
  • Antique Pair of Sketches by Thomas Barker of Bath 18th Century
  • Antique Pair of Sketches by Thomas Barker of Bath 18th Century
  • Antique Pair of Sketches by Thomas Barker of Bath 18th Century
Ref:R0008
Price: £850.00
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A beautiful pair of composition sketches by Thomas Barker of Bath, 1769-1847,  dating from the  late 18th Century

The finely executed drawings feature country folk in various activities rendered in crayon and conte on off-white paper. The composition gives excellent perspective and a good sense of depth to both drawings.


On the backs are labels from Malvern Wells Gallery, Fine art dealer Worcestershire.

Framed in the original  pair of giltwood glazed frames.
 

Condition:

In excellent condition, please see photos for confirmation.

Dimensions in cm:

Height 32 x Width 27 x Depth 3

Dimensions in inches:

Height 1 foot, 1 inch x Width 11 inches x Depth 1 inch

Barker was born in 1769, at Trosnant near the village of Pontypool, in Monmouthshire. His father, Benjamin Barker, was the son of a barrister, and practiced as an artist, but never attempted more than the portraits of horses. He eventually took up employment as a Japanware decorator.
 
From an early age Barker showed a remarkable talent for drawing figures and designing landscapes; although he never took a lesson in either drawing or painting and was entirely self-taught. When he was sixteen his family moved to Bath where the patronage of an opulent coach-builder named Spackman, allowed him to follow his talent as an artist. During the first four years he employed himself in copying the works of the old Dutch and Flemish masters. At the age of twenty-one he was sent to Rome, with ample funds to maintain his position there as a gentleman. While there he painted very little, contenting himself with society life.
 
Barker was an occasional exhibitor at the Royal Academy and the British Institution for almost fifty years, during which period he exhibited nearly one hundred pictures. He was a prolific artist, and painted a wide range of subjects. Few pictures of the English school are more generally known and appreciated than The Woodman, of which it appears two were painted, both of them from nature, and of life size: the first was sold to Mr. Macklin for 500 guineas; the second, for the same amount, became the property of Lord W. Paulett. In 1821 he painted the Trial of Queen Caroline, which included portraits of many celebrated men; but perhaps the best effort of Barker's pencil skill was the fresco, 30 feet in length, and 12 feet in height, representing The Inroad of the Turks upon Scio, in April, 1822, painted on the wall of his residence, Sion Hill, Bath.
 
While Barker's talents were in full vigour, no artist of his time had a greater hold on popular favour; his pictures of The Woodman, Old Tom (painted before he was seventeen years of age), and gipsy groups and rustic figures, were copied onto almost every possible material: Staffordshire pottery, Worcester china, Manchester cottons, and Glasgow linens. At one time he amassed considerable property by the sale of his works, and spent a large sum in building a mansion for his residence, enriching it with sculpture and other works of art. He died at Bath in 1847.
 
Barker was one of the first British artists to use Lithography as a print medium and contributed two prints Young Boy Seated, and Tilemakers  to Specimens of Polyautography, the first British publication of a collection of Lithographic plates, originally published by Philipp André in 1803,[6] and then reissued in an enlarged edition by Vollweiler in 1806-7. Barker's series of Rustic figures after nature published in Bath in 1813 in a small edition, is the first series of lithographs by a British single artist. Some of Barker's stones survive.
 
Works
There are six paintings by Barker in the Tate Gallery, including A Woodman and his Dog in a Storm (originally presented to the National Gallery in 1868) and several landscapes.
The British Museum holds a number of Barker's drawings and prints.
Three of Barker's paintings, Italian Landscape 1808, Landscape with a Waterfall and Landscape with Cattle are in Wolverhampton Art Gallery.

Angelica Kauffman, RA (1741 - 1807)

was a Swiss-born Austrian Neoclassical painter who had a successful career in London and Rome. Though born as "Kauffmann", Kauffman is the preferred spelling of her name in English; it is the form she herself used most in signing her correspondence, documents and paintings.

While Kauffman produced many types of art, she identified herself primarily as a history painter, an unusual designation for a woman artist in the 18th century. History painting, was considered the most elite and lucrative category in academic painting during this time period. Under the direction of Sir Joshua Reynolds, the Royal Academy made a strong effort to promote history painting to a native audience who were more interested in commissioning and buying portraits and landscapes.

Despite the popularity that Kauffman enjoyed in British society and her success as an artist, she was disappointed by the relative apathy that the British had towards history painting. Ultimately she left Britain for the continent, where history painting was better established, held in higher esteem and patronized.

The works of Angelica Kauffman have retained their reputation. By 1911, rooms decorated with her work were still to be seen in various quarters. At Hampton Court was a portrait of the duchess of Brunswick; in the National Portrait Gallery, a self-portrait. There were other pictures by her at Paris, at Dresden, in the Hermitage at St Petersburg, in the Alte Pinakothek atMunich, in Kadriorg Palace, Tallinn (Estonia).

Satinwood

is a hard and durable wood with a satinlike sheen, much used in cabinetmaking, especially in marquetry. It comes from two tropical trees of the family Rutaceae (rue family). East Indian or Ceylon satinwood is the yellowish or dark-brown heartwood of Chloroxylon swietenia.

The lustrous, fine-grained, usually figured wood is used for furniture, cabinetwork, veneers, and backs of brushes. West Indian satinwood, sometimes called yellow wood, is considered superior. It is the golden yellow, lustrous, even-grained wood found in the Florida Keys and the West Indies.

It has long been valued for furniture. It is also used for musical instruments, veneers, and other purposes. Satinwood is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Sapindales, family Rutaceae.

Our reference: R0008

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