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Antique Satinwood Writing Table Desk Maple & Co Paris 19thC

Antique Satinwood Writing Table Desk Maple & Co Paris 19thC Sold
Ref:08530

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This is a beautiful antique late Victorian satinwood writing table,  circa 1880 in date.

This superb quality desk is made from stunning satinwood which has been crossbanded in Kingwood with wonderful ebony line inlaid stringing and it is finished all round so it will look amazing in the centre of your study!!

It is fitted with a stunning black and blind tooled leather writing surface and
 has three capacious drawers that are fitted with the original decorative brass drop handles. One of the drawers bears the impressed mark of the renowned retailer Maple & Co, Paris.

It is raised on elegant inlaid square tapering legs that terminate in brass castors, and there is a delightful shell inlaid spandrel at either side of the top of each leg, a masterful touch by a top cabinet maker.


With working locks and key.

The craftsmanship that has gone into this desk is second to none, and it will soon become the centrepiece of your furniture collection.
 

Condition:

In excellent condition having been beautifully cleaned, polished and releathered in our workshops, please see photos for confirmation.
 

Dimensions in cm:

Height 76 x Width 164 x Depth 94

Dimensions in inches:

Height 2 feet, 6 inches x Width 5 feet, 5 inches x Depth 3 feet, 1 inch

Maple & Co
the renowned furniture retailer of London, Paris and Buenos Aires,   were famous for top quality furniture.

They were by Royal Appointment and  became one of the leading furniture manufacturers of the Victorian and Edwardian eras. They used only the finest quality timber which was imported directly from all over the world.
 
Maple and Company were founded in 1841 in Tottenham Court Road, London and had premises there until 1997.  By the 1880s they were the largest and most successful furniture makers in the world, their huge emporium having become a tourist attraction in its own right. In addition to their middle class clientele, they furnished Embassies, hotels, beautiful homes and palaces all over the globe, including Tsar Nicholas's Winter Palace, the Hoffburg Imperial Palace in Vienna, and many of Britain's country houses.


Satinwood 
is a hard and durable wood with a satinlike sheen, much used in cabinetmaking, especially in marquetry. It comes from two tropical trees of the family Rutaceae (rue family). East Indian or Ceylon satinwood is the yellowish or dark-brown heartwood of Chloroxylon swietenia. 

The lustrous, fine-grained, usually figured wood is used for furniture, cabinetwork, veneers, and backs of brushes. West Indian satinwood, sometimes called yellow wood, is considered superior. It is the golden yellow, lustrous, even-grained wood found in the Florida Keys and the West Indies. 

It has long been valued for furniture. It is also used for musical instruments, veneers, and other purposes. Satinwood is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Sapindales, family Rutaceae.

 

Alfred Charles Hobbs 
(1812 - 1891) born in America, when Alfred was only three years old his farther died leaving the family destitute. Beginning at the age of ten, A. C. Hobbs worked at a variety of jobs ranging from farm help to wood carving, carriage building, tinsmithing, and harness making. While an apprentice at the Sandwich Glass Company, he learned to make doorknobs and became interested in locks. For a while he was a partner in a small firm of Jones & Hobbs, lock makers. About 1840 he became a salesman for the Day & Newell Company - one of America's foremost lock makers. Here he earned a reputation as an expert lock picker. He found that the best way to sell his Companies locks was to pick the locks of his competitors. 

In 1851 he was sent to the Great Exhibition in London where he successfully picked the famous Chubb and Bramah locks. ( "Great Lock Controversy" .) 
Assisted by his newly won fame and publicity, he founded Hobbs & Co., London, in 1852

 

  

Angelica Kauffman, RA (1741 - 1807)

was a Swiss-born Austrian Neoclassical painter who had a successful career in London and Rome. Though born as "Kauffmann", Kauffman is the preferred spelling of her name in English; it is the form she herself used most in signing her correspondence, documents and paintings.

While Kauffman produced many types of art, she identified herself primarily as a history painter, an unusual designation for a woman artist in the 18th century. History painting, was considered the most elite and lucrative category in academic painting during this time period. Under the direction of Sir Joshua Reynolds, the Royal Academy made a strong effort to promote history painting to a native audience who were more interested in commissioning and buying portraits and landscapes.

Despite the popularity that Kauffman enjoyed in British society and her success as an artist, she was disappointed by the relative apathy that the British had towards history painting. Ultimately she left Britain for the continent, where history painting was better established, held in higher esteem and patronized.

The works of Angelica Kauffman have retained their reputation. By 1911, rooms decorated with her work were still to be seen in various quarters. At Hampton Court was a portrait of the duchess of Brunswick; in the National Portrait Gallery, a self-portrait. There were other pictures by her at Paris, at Dresden, in the Hermitage at St Petersburg, in the Alte Pinakothek atMunich, in Kadriorg Palace, Tallinn (Estonia).

Satinwood

is a hard and durable wood with a satinlike sheen, much used in cabinetmaking, especially in marquetry. It comes from two tropical trees of the family Rutaceae (rue family). East Indian or Ceylon satinwood is the yellowish or dark-brown heartwood of Chloroxylon swietenia.

The lustrous, fine-grained, usually figured wood is used for furniture, cabinetwork, veneers, and backs of brushes. West Indian satinwood, sometimes called yellow wood, is considered superior. It is the golden yellow, lustrous, even-grained wood found in the Florida Keys and the West Indies.

It has long been valued for furniture. It is also used for musical instruments, veneers, and other purposes. Satinwood is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Sapindales, family Rutaceae.

Our reference: 08530