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Vintage 7ft Diam Mahogany Jupe Dining Table, Leaf Cabinet & 10 Chairs

Vintage 7ft Diam Mahogany Jupe Dining Table, Leaf Cabinet & 10 Chairs Sold
Ref:08485a

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This beautiful dining set comprises a Regency Revival Jupe style dining table mid 20th Century in date, with the matching set of ten Regency style dining chairs.

The table has a solid mahogany top that has five additional leaves that can be added around the circumference. It is very stable as it has a  circular mahogany central base raised on downswept splay legs that terminate in brass lion's paw sabots and castors, which give the table it's superb stability.

You pull out some slides, see photos, from the sides of the table and fit the leaves on them by sliding them onto the slides and securing them with brass clips, which are located underneath.


With the leaves attached around the circumference, it is 215 cm, approx 7ft, in diameter, and could seat 10 people in comfort.

With the leaves removed it is 154 cm, approx 5ft, in diameter, and could seat 6 to 8 people.

It has an attractive matching mahogany baize lined cabinet in which the leaves and clips are housed when not in use.
 

This fascinating table illustrates all the very best elements of English cabinet-making combined with the remarkable burst of inventiveness of the Industrial Revolution. It was not until John Johnstone and Robert Jupe patented their ingenious design in March 1835 for an expanding round table, that round dining tables, which had suffered from the problem of not offering flexibility of seating, could compete with the established rectangular extending dining tables.

The matching set of ten Regency Revival Swag Back chairs are made of solid mahogany and have been upholstered in a sumptuous olive green alkantara fabric.


There is no mistaking the fine craftsmanship of this handsome set, which is certain to become a treasured addition to your furniture collection, and a talking point with guests at meal times.

 

Condition:

In excellent condition the table having been beautifully cleaned and polished and the chairs polished and reupholstered in our workshops, please see photos for confirmation.

Jupe Dining Table
In 1835 Robert Jupe was granted British Patent No. 6788 for an expanding table. The original Jupe expanding table includes a table top that is divided into a number of sections. Each section is connected to an underlying frame structure, such that when the table top is rotated, the sections move radially outward, increasing the effective size of the table top. Once the table top has been rotated to move the table top sections outward, leaves are inserted between the sections, so as to fill in the spaces created by the outward movement of the sections. Because the table top sections diverge and move radially outward from a central point, the Jupe table top retains its shape in its expanded configuration.

The Jupe table has now become one of the most valuable and sought after antiques. Original Jupe tables in good condition may sell for up to $350,000 at the time of writing. However, despite its popularity, the Jupe table has been very difficult to mass produce, because its workings are both extremely complex and entirely handcrafted.

For example, the frame structure that supports the table top sections in the Jupe table is comprised of many individual beam structures that are secured together to form the frame. Each of those beams must be individually made and assembled to exacting tolerances in order to ensure that the table top sections will move freely and mate in the center of the table top to form a substantially contiguous table surface in both the contracted and expanded configurations. The manufacture of such a structure is time-consuming and is not conducive to rapid production.

Other aspects of the Jupe table design also make the design difficult to implement. For example, in at least some of the existing examples of functioning Jupe tables, the pivot for the table top is a threaded rod that runs the entire length of the table pedestal. That is an extremely difficult and time-consuming configuration to replicate.

Angelica Kauffman, RA (1741 - 1807)

was a Swiss-born Austrian Neoclassical painter who had a successful career in London and Rome. Though born as "Kauffmann", Kauffman is the preferred spelling of her name in English; it is the form she herself used most in signing her correspondence, documents and paintings.

While Kauffman produced many types of art, she identified herself primarily as a history painter, an unusual designation for a woman artist in the 18th century. History painting, was considered the most elite and lucrative category in academic painting during this time period. Under the direction of Sir Joshua Reynolds, the Royal Academy made a strong effort to promote history painting to a native audience who were more interested in commissioning and buying portraits and landscapes.

Despite the popularity that Kauffman enjoyed in British society and her success as an artist, she was disappointed by the relative apathy that the British had towards history painting. Ultimately she left Britain for the continent, where history painting was better established, held in higher esteem and patronized.

The works of Angelica Kauffman have retained their reputation. By 1911, rooms decorated with her work were still to be seen in various quarters. At Hampton Court was a portrait of the duchess of Brunswick; in the National Portrait Gallery, a self-portrait. There were other pictures by her at Paris, at Dresden, in the Hermitage at St Petersburg, in the Alte Pinakothek atMunich, in Kadriorg Palace, Tallinn (Estonia).

Satinwood

is a hard and durable wood with a satinlike sheen, much used in cabinetmaking, especially in marquetry. It comes from two tropical trees of the family Rutaceae (rue family). East Indian or Ceylon satinwood is the yellowish or dark-brown heartwood of Chloroxylon swietenia.

The lustrous, fine-grained, usually figured wood is used for furniture, cabinetwork, veneers, and backs of brushes. West Indian satinwood, sometimes called yellow wood, is considered superior. It is the golden yellow, lustrous, even-grained wood found in the Florida Keys and the West Indies.

It has long been valued for furniture. It is also used for musical instruments, veneers, and other purposes. Satinwood is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Sapindales, family Rutaceae.

Our reference: 08485a